2010 Houston FIA User Group/Bioenergy Workshop presentations

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  1. Tim Adams , SC Forestry Commission

    Title: Using TPO and FIA data to determine biomass availability in South Carolina

    abstract not available

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  2. Harold Balbach , US Army ERDC

    Title: Carbon sequestration and biomass: The military context

    Present uses of the approximately 25 million acres of military landholdings are a complex mix of active training, safety setbacks, and other mission uses. In addition, we support hundreds of endangered, threatened and at-risk species. This is more difficult recently following base closure programs which reduce the number of installations, but not their military missions. Thus, remaining locations must support intensified mission needs as well as continuing support for these sensitive species. When one examines proposals for use of biomass energy, many questions arise, such as how to determine potential demand, and what capital costs would be needed? What about the effect on land uses, including need for a realistic training environment and these wildlife management requirements? DoD is actively registering their industrial CO2 generations but is not generally measuring terrestrial pools. At least 15 million acres of forest and woodland are involved, but there is no program for terrestrial sequestration calculation. Some biogeochemical research studies have looked at carbon pools, and a non-research study calculated forest carbon on one site as an adjunct to a CO2 management study of operations generation activities.

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  3. Ken Brewer , USDA FS WO

    Title: New technology

    abstract not available

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  4. William Burkman , USDA FS SRS FIA
    Program Manager

    Title: Resources for people who want to analyze FIA data

    During the last decade numerous on-line tools have been developed and training sessions to use these tools have been conducted for users of FIA Data. This presentation will be a review and provide a short description of available tools and discuss training opportunities. FIA online data tools are organized into to three general categories - basic, advanced, and expert. Basic tools include online spreadsheets, published summary tables, and tables included in various FIA documents. Advanced tools include FIDO, EVALIDator, and tools developed by NCASI such as Gforest, COLE (Carbon online estimator), and SOLE (Southern online estimator). Expert tools include the downloading of FIA data and FIDO. Online tools also exist to query the Timber Products Output information and the National Woodland Owners Survey data. Training opportunities include classroom sessions, webinars, self-guided tutorials, and working one-on-one with experienced FIA data analysis staff. Users of FIA data are cautioned to 1) review available FIA database documents, 2) familiarize themselves with available FIA field guides and procedures, and 3) practice with the online tools prior to participating in these sessions.

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  5. Renate Bush , USDA NFS R1

    Title: Biomass information needs

    abstract not available

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  6. Brett Butler , USDA Forest Service

    Title: Issues related to recent changes in forest land owhership

    abstract not available

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  7. Burl Carraway , Texas Forest Service

    Title: NASF recent resolutions about what FIA should provide

    A related document can be viewed here

    Presentation not available

  8. Michael Clutter , UGA

    Title: Summary of recent FIA SPA review

    abstract not available

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  9. Richard Guldin , USDA Forest Service

    Title: The view from the banks of the Potomac

    abstract not available

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  10. Richard Guldin , USDA Forest Service

    Title: How will FIA evolve to meet new demands?

    abstract not available

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  11. Linda Heath , USDA FS, Northern Station
    Research Forester

    Title: A Grand Plan for FIA’s role in a FS National Carbon Accounting System

    USDA Forest Service, Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) data have been used as the fundamental basis for the official forest greenhouse gas (GHG) inventory estimates, including carbon stocks, and projections of stocks. Information from timber product outputs surveys and utilization studies is also key. In many ways, the FIA design is a National Carbon Accounting System, especially in terms of forest carbon stock estimation. Full implementation and additional NA01CtweakingNA01D though is needed. However, additional information including measurements are needed for change estimation over time in terms of carbon dioxide, which is more accurate when gross changes are measured. Emissions from dead wood need decay rates and would need to be modeled or based on intensive site measurements. Soil estimation would need a similar approach. The use of harvested wood as biomass is already an important component of forest carbon accounting, and FIA surveys should ensure methods capture that use.

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  12. David Heinzen , MN DNR

    Title: Philosophy and recent history of user group meetings

    abstract not available

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  13. Peter Ince , US Forest Service
    Research Forester

    Title: Projecting supply and demand related to bioenergy

    This presentation discusses approaches to projecting overall timber supply and demand in relation to wood use for bioenergy in the context of the ongoing 2010 RPA forest assessment. The presentation discusses the background and analytical framework of the 2010 RPA forest assessment, and briefly describes wood bioenergy aspects of the U.S. Forest Products Module (USFPM), a partial market equilibrium model of the U.S. forest sector that has been developed within the Global Forest Products Model (GFPM). The presentation explains the bioenergy elements of FIA/TPO timber supply and timber product output data that are included in USFPM, and suggests potential bioenergy data needs for future RPA assessments.

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  14. John Johnson , Mead Westvace

    Title: Eucalyptus bioenergy plantations

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  15. Liz LaPoint , USDA FS NRS FIA

    Title: Training session for FIA Tools

    abstract not available

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  16. Joanne Lenahan , Weyerhaeuser Company

    Title: Biomass energy: A Weyerhaeuser perspective on opportunities and challenges

    abstract not available

    Presentation not available

  17. Alan Lucier , NCASI
    Senior Vice President

    Title: Forest Biomass Sustainability: Policy Themes and Research Needs

    Government policies and other market forces portend incresing use of "cellulosic biomass." In the US, timberlands are the dominant source of cellulosic biomass and will remain a major source in the future.

    Current themes in US biomass policy include: discourage timber harvesting in naturally-regenerated forests; discourage establishment of new plantations; and encourage new uses of biomass but not traditional uses. If continued, these themes will impose high opportunity costs on the forest sector and discourage investment in forest stewardship and forest-based manufacturing.

    An alternative policy approach would treat the forest sector as a platform for innovation in bioenergy, biomaterials, and natural resource conservation. Ideally, biomass policies would supplement established laws and conservation programs that encourage sustainable forest management and sustainable growth in forest-based manufacturing of new and traditional products.

    NCASI is organizing a Forest Biomass Cooperative to sponsor scientific investigations that support sustainable production and use of biomass grown in forestry and agro-forestry settings. The cooperative's potential scope includes: resource monitoring and assessment; water quality and quantity; biodiversity; forest technology; carbon footprints of products & value chains; and emissions associated with wood combustion and processing.

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  18. John Paul McTague , Rayonier
    Technical Services Manager

    Title: Biomass issues for wood transactions (green weight vs dry weight)

    Irrespective of whether green logs are composed of large sized, older trees or small, young trees, the green weight per cubic measure is relatively constant. Specific gravity and moisture content of logs are inversely related, which in turn implies that the green weight varies little among juvenile or adult wood. Of course, age and log size are positively correlated with dry weight. The forest products industry has traditionally been interested in determining dry weight because of its effect on pulp yield and strength properties. Renewed interest on the determination of dry weight has been accentuated with the USDA Farm Service Agency, Biomass Crop Assistance Program (BCAP), since payment is on a dry weight basis. The author contends that moisture meters can not be used to compute the dry weight of loads consisting of green wood material with a moisture content above the fiber saturation point. Alternatives to moisture meters do exist, however most of them are in the research or proof-of-concept stage. The prediction of dry weight should be possible, based upon regression equations using the green weight, number of logs, size of logs, and stacking factor.

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  19. Todd Morgan , U. of Montana

    Title: FIA's TPO strategic vision: Where we are and need to go

    abstract not available

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  20. Todd Morgan , U. of Montana

    Title: Everything you ever wanted to know about TPO and biomass

    abstract not available

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  21. John Moser , Purdue University/SAF

    Title: Welcome to the user group meeting

    abstract not available

    Presentation not available

  22. John Nickerson , Dogwood Springs Forestry

    Title: Forest Project Protocol v3.1: Use of FIA data

    abstract not available

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  23. Charley Peterson , USFS-PNW Research Station

    Title: Progress on achieving compatibility across all regions

    abstract not available

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  24. Charley Peterson , USFS-PNW Research Station

    Title: PNW Research Station Plan for Urban Inventory

    abstract not available

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  25. Steve Prisley , Virginia Tech

    Title: Opportunities for integrating new technology ... or not

    abstract not available

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  26. Kenneth Skog , USDA Forest Sevice
    Project Leader

    Title: Using TPO and DOE/EIA surveys to track wood biomass/ bioenergy – How can we improve methods?

    The Forest Service timber product output surveys estimate amounts of fuelwood and primary mill residues used for energy. Department of Energy estimate wood biomass used by major end use categories – residential, industrial, commercial, electric power. What wood is used for what intermediate products and final uses is not determined by the surveys. To help estimate how wood is used in more detail several suggestions are made on improving TPO estimates – at least for national and regional aggregations: Expand Timber product output categories to include 1) roundwood for residential fuelwood, 2) roundwood/ chips for other energy users, and 3) roundwood for pellets. Expand primary wood residue USES to include 1) pellets, 2) wood for bioenergy – electric power or combined heat / power, and 3) wood for bioenergy – other. Survey pellet mill wood SOURCES

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  27. Brad Smith , USFS

    Title: The Protected Areas Database of the US and Recent Developments in reserved forest classification

    abstract not available

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  28. Brad Smith , USFS

    Title: Biomass and development of the Component Ratio Method

    abstract not available

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  29. dave struble , maine forest service

    Title: Have new biomass estimates in FIADB4 caused continuity problems?

    abstract not available

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  30. Eric Vance , NCASI
    Principal Scientist

    Title: Biomass Harvesting and Forest Site Productivity

    New markets for forest-derived bioenergy have raised questions over the effects of intensive biomass harvesting on forest site productivity. Sustaining site productivity involves the manipulations of site resources, particularly water, nutrients, and sunlight. Although intensive management regimes may include greater biomass utilization, owners of intensively managed forests also have greater flexility to adopt practices that prevent or mitigate site productivity losses that may result from intensive harvesting. Site productivity research studies have shown that many sites are quite resilient to intensive biomass removals, and that the application of practices such as weed control and bedding are often more important to productivity of the tree crop. However, more research is needed to identify sites that are sensitive to intensive harvesting, to assess the effects of repeated harvest removals, and to identify indicators of change and practices that can be used to prevent or mitigate negative effects.

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  31. Paul VanDeusen , NCASI
    Principal Research Scientist

    Title: The many uses of FIA data

    A brief review is given of how FIA went from a periodic to an annual inventory. This is followed by discussion of 4 different applications of FIA data that have been recently made by the author. The applications include using FIA data to estimate forest conversion rates, sustainability and to make a comparison of management vs preservation for carbon sequestration in Georgia.

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  32. John Vissage , USDA Forest Service

    Title: Issues related to remeasuring annual plots and mapped conditions

    abstract not available

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  33. Michael Wilson , USDA FS RMRS FIA

    Title: FIA Business Report

    abstract not available

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  34. Tim Young , University of Tennessee, Forest Products Center
    Presenting Author

    Title: A web acessible biomass siting assessment model, Biomass SIte Assessment Tool (BIOSAT)

    Key to ensuring long-term, sustainable cellulose supply is the assessment of the economic availability of woody and agricultural-derived biomass feedstocks. The genesis for any emerging or existing industry is the ability to successfully secure commercial business loans with a defendable business plan for the expansion of existing plants or development of new manufacturing facilities. A key component of any business plan must include a profitable strategy for the geographic location of a cellulose using facility. This study addresses the problem with the development of web-based system for optimal siting of cellulose using mills called the Biomass Site Assessment Tool (BioSAT) The project integrates contemporary web-based information technology (e.g., Virtual Earth and Microsoft SQL) with existing U.S. Forest Service FIA data, agricultural data, harvesting, and transportation models. BioSAT has real-time database update capabilities. Transportation networks of truck and truck/rail combinations are presented for least cost solutions by zip code tabulation areas for a potential demand site. Low cost biobasins are assessed for 13 Southern United States. ProducersNA019 total costs, average total costs, and marginal cost curves are estimated.

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